Transmission

Production Status:

Pre - Production

Company:

Goldfinch Entertainment

Category:

Film


A 90 minute Feature Film

Delivers 2019

With GCHQ’s 100th anniversary in 2019, this timely 90 minute feature documentary is a journey into the unknown realm of the British secret service: Government Communication Headquarters (GCHQ).

GCHQ is the successor to the famous Bletchley Park wartime code-breaking organisation, it was set up following the First World War in 1919 and is the largest and most secretive intelligence organisation in the country. During the war, it commanded more staff than MI5 and MI6 combined and has produced a number of intelligence triumphs, as well as some notable failures. Since the end of the Cold War, it has played a pivotal role in shaping Britain’s secret state. Still, little is known about it.

Transmission sheds fresh light on Britain’s role in the Cold War – from the secret tunnels dug beneath Vienna and Berlin to tap Soviet phone lines, and daring submarine missions to gather intelligence from the Soviet fleet, to the notorious case of Geoffrey Pine, one of the most damaging moles ever recruited by the Soviets inside British intelligence.

As “The Wall” came down and the world moved into the digital era, so did GCHQ. In 2003 GCHQ took residence at the Doughnut, the largest public sector building in Europe. Now considered to be the most advanced intelligence service in the world, GCHQ came under fierce media attention because of a little known operation – codename “Tempora”.

The existence of Tempora was revealed by Edward Snowden, a former American intelligence contractor who leaked information about the program to former Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald in May 2013, as part of his revelations of government-sponsored mass surveillance programs. Documents Snowden acquired claimed that data collected by the Tempora program is shared with the National Security Agency of the United States among others.

The release of “Transmission” will coincide with the Centenary of GQHQ and promises to deliver stunning 90 minutes of Cinema history.


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